Lecture Series 2016-17

The Bilderfahrzeuge Lecture Series at the Warburg Institute 2016-17

Programme

(also available as a PDF)

5 October 2016 Roger Sabin Central Saint Martins UAL The Origins of Comics Criticism  
16 November 2016 Mechthild Fend UCL Medusa’s Hair. Images, Diseases and Terror in Post-Revolutionary France
14 December 2016 Stephen Bann Bristol Paul Delaroche’s Egyptian Excursion: the studies in preparation for Moses on the Nile (1853)
11 January 2017 Sachiko Kusukawa  Cambridge Copying as a form of knowing: early modern scientific images
8 February 2017 Tristan Weddigen Zürich Heinrich Wölfflin in the Hispanic World
1 March 2017 Tamar Garb UCL Constance Stuart’s War: Women and Documentary’s Excess.
10 May 2017  Zainab Bahrani Columbia Return of Images: Chance Encounters in the Afterlives of Antiquity
14 June 2017 Finbarr Barry Flood New York University The Relic as Image: Prophetic Aura in an Age of Technological Reproducibility

Lecture: Constance Stuart’s War: Women and Documentary’s Excess

Professor Tamar Garb

Durning-Lawrence Chair of History of Art
Department of History of Art,

University College London (UCL)

London, 1 March 2017, 5:30 pm

Warburg Institute
Woburn Square
London WC1H 0AB

Admission free; please register for this event through the Events section of the School of Advanced Study (SAS) here.

This lecture looks at a remarkable photograph taken by the South African war correspondent in WW2, Constance Stuart (Larrabee) at the moment of the liberation of France. The photograph, one of nine in a series, depicts one of the femmes tondues the sheared women collectively punished for having ‘associated with the Germans’. It is read in relation to other photographs in the series as well as the agenda of Libertas, the first picture magazine in South Africa, for whom Stuart worked. But there is more to Stuart’s relationship to the image than the need to document the occasion. What seeps out from the image is something that exceeds documentary’s desire, inadvertently articulating both the photographer’s and the protagonist’s position in history.

Lecture: Heinrich Wölfflin in the Hispanic World

Professor Tristan Weddigentristanweddigenlectureimage

Chair for Early Modern Art
Kunsthistorisches Institut
University of Zürich

Rudolf Wittkower Visting Professor
Bibliotheca Hertziana, Rome

London, 8 February 2017, 5:30 pm

Admission free; please register for this event through the Events section of the School of Advanced Study (SAS) here.

Warburg Institute
Woburn Square
London WC1H 0AB

One century from the first publication of one of the most influential books of art history, Heinrich Wölfflin’s „Principles of Art History“ of 1915, Professor Weddigen’s paper will explore one major part of its global reception: its impact on Hispanic and Latin American art and architectural history and aesthetics since the 1920s. The aim is to show how Kunstwissenschaft was translated, adopted, and appropriated for the construction of national, political, ethnic identities.

Lecture: Uses of images in early modern scientific knowledge

Professor Sachiko Kusukawagessnerpelicanzentralbibliothekzurich2120657

Fellow in History and Philosophy of Science
Trinity College
Cambridge

London, 11 January 2017, 5:30 pm

Admission free; please register for this event through the Events section of the School of Advanced Study (SAS) here.

Warburg Institute
Woburn Square
London WC1H 0AB

Professor Kuskawa will give a paper arguing for the importance of images as a versatile means of shaping and transmitting scientific knowledge in the early modern period. Traditionally, historians of science have looked to illustrations in early printed books as evidence of first-hand observation.  But a large number of these illustrations, including those labeled as ‘ad vivum’, turn out to be images copied from elsewhere. Copying images was undertaken for a variety of reasons in the early modern period, including as a way to save time and money for the printers. Rather than a disappointing, inferior iteration of first-hand observation, I propose that copying was a necessary and versatile means of shaping and sharing scientific knowledge, but as with any form of transmission, copying entailed some process of transformation and translation. This paper will discuss the many different uses through which images came to constitute early modern scientific knowledge.

Congratulations #20: Pablo Schneider (Ed.): Edgar Wind – Die Bildsprache Michelangelos

Edgar Wind – Die Bildsprache Michelangelos (Berlin 2017)

Pablo Schneider (Hrsg.)/(Ed.)

Research Associate, Bilderfahrzeuge Project

1936 stellte der Kunsthistoriker und Philosoph Edgar Wind sein Manuskript zu Michelangelos Deckenfresken der Sixtinischen Kapelle fertig. Wind begriff den christlichen Erlösungsgedanken als fundamentales Thema des gesamten Raumes und erkannte ein polares Beziehungsgeflecht, welches ihm das Bildprogramm vollständig erschloss. Methodische Ansätze Aby Warburgs aufnehmend, dessen Mitarbeiter Wind in Hamburg war, analysierte er die Themenwahl Michelangelos. Obwohl fertiggestellt, wurde das Werk nie veröffentlicht. Es liegt nun erstmals in gedruckter Fassung vor, begleitet von einem ausführlichen Nachwort des Herausgebers.

Lecture: Paul Delaroche’s Egyptian Excursion: The Studies in Preparation for Moses on the Nile (1853)

Professor Stephen Bannstephenbanndelarocheimage

Emeritus Professor of History of Art, Research
Fellow in History of Art (Historical Studies)
University of Bristol

London, 14 December 2016, 5:30 pm

Admission free; please register for this event on our Eventbrite page here.

Warburg Institute
Woburn Square
London WC1H 0AB

Paul Delaroche’s drawings and oil studies reveal his tendency to ponder a range of different iconographic sources over a long period.The preparation of his Moses on the Nile is a particularly interesting example, since some of the original drawings in the Louvre are customarily attributed to the early 1840s, while the large painting (originally in the collection of Baron James de Rothschild, but now lost) is dated 1853. A drawing that has recently come to light indicates Delaroche’s initial debt to the paintings on the subject by Nicolas Poussin.

Congratulations #19: Andreas Beyer: „Thinking in Pictures: What Franz Marc and Wassily Kandinsky have in common with Aby Warburg“

“Thinking in Pictures: What Franz Marc and Wassily Kandinsky have in common with Aby Warburg” in „Kandinsky, Marc & Der Blaue Reiter“, Fondation Beyeler Basel/Riehen 2016, Hajte Dantz Verlag, Berlin 2016, S. 18-23.

Andreas Beyer

Speaker of the Bilderfahrzeuge Project

In this essay, Bilderfahrzeuge Speaker Professor Andreas Beyer traces the origins of an integral element of contemporary art theory – the possibility of an intellectual and theoretical discourse based entirely on images – ‘art speaking for itself’.

Weiterlesen

Lecture: Medusa’s Hair. Images, Diseases and Terror in Post-Revolutionary France

Dr Mechthild Fend

Reader in History of Art
Department of History of Art
University College London

London, 16 November 2016, 5:30 pm

Admission free; please register for this event on our Eventbrite page here.

Warburg Institute
Woburn Square
London WC1H 0AB

Mechthild Fend, Reader in History of Art at University College London, will give a lecture on the migrations of the visual and mental image of Medusa between early modern art, French revolutionary prints and medical illustrations and discourses.

Lecture: The Origins of Comics Criticism

roger-sabin-lecture-imageDr Roger Sabin

Professor of Popular Culture
Central Saint Martins
University of the Arts London

London, 5 October 2016, 5:30 pm

Admission free; please register for this event on our Eventbrite page here.

Warburg Institute
Woburn Square
London WC1H 0AB

 

Roger Sabin, Professor of Popular Culture at Central Saint Martins, University of the Arts London, will give a lecture on the way in which the new medium of comics was perceived by critics in the late 19th century, focusing on the UK (at the time the world-leading producer). The late Victorian period saw an increasingly intense discussion about ‘culture’ – what it was, and where it was heading – spurred by the growth of working class leisure pursuits, and middle class concerns about them.  Weiterlesen

‚Ghost Objects‘ – 19th century paper mould techniques and the portability of antiquities

Blog Post – Anna McSweeney July 2016

Among the members of the Bilderfahrzeuge group, we have been thinking recently about  ‚immutable mobiles‘ and the object-oriented theories of Bruno Latour in relation to our work on image vehicles, the movement of images. In his essay ‚Visualisation and Cognition‘, Latour casts inscriptions as the explanatory principle of modern scientific culture. He uses the term ‚immutable mobiles‘ to describe objects which are characterized by the properties of mobility, immutability, presentability, readibility and combinability with each other. He claims that the history of these objects is the history of scholarship in visualisation and cognition.

It seemed to me that paper moulds are a good example of an immutable mobile. Using layers of wet paper to make a negative impression of a building or object, from which a positive could be cast in plaster, paper moulds were used by archaeologists and antiquarians in the mid-nineteenth century to copy the façades of monuments that were far away, at Angkor Wat in Cambodia, Palenque in Mexico or the Alhambra in Spain, for example. Described as ‚facsimiles‘ by the inventor of the technique, Lottin de Laval (1810-1903), paper moulds allowed explorers to transport a version of a building or sculpture with all its details back to the museum in the age before both digital reproduction and cheap and reliable photography. Weiterlesen