Project

‘Bilderfahrzeuge’

Exhibtion: Experiencing Images, Warburg Institute, 17 November - 12 December 2014

Exhibition: Experiencing Images, Warburg Institute, 17 November – 12 December 2014

‘Bilderfahrzeuge’, literally meaning image vehicles, is a term, coined by the German art historian Aby Warburg (1866-1929). It refers to a concept that was of the utmost importance for Warburg, since his work sought to trace lines of continuity linking Antiquity with the Renaissance – lines that he felt materialised out of ‘Bildwanderung’, the migration of images. Of course, Warburg is not the only, and was not the first scholar to have shown an interest in such an idea. Count Goblet D’Alviella’s 1891 study of The Migration of Symbols is only one early case among many displaying a similar approach. But Warburg succeeded in articulating the phenomenon in an iconic fashion: in the form of his famous Bildatlas whose protagonists – motifs, the migration of which across time and space becomes apparent over the course of the atlas’ various panels – are definitive ‘Bilderfahrzeuge’.

Financers and Partners

The Warburg Institute (London), hub of the 'Bilderfahrzeuge' Project

The Warburg Institute (London), hub of the ‚Bilderfahrzeuge‘ Project

The research project ‘Bilderfahrzeuge. Aby Warburg’s Legacy and the Future of Iconology’ sets out to explore the migration of images, objects, commodities, and texts, in short: the migration of ideas in a broad historical and geographical context. It is funded by the German Federal Ministry of  Education and Research (Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung), realised in cooperation with the Max Weber Stiftung, and situated at the Warburg Institute, London, as well as at the Deutsche Forum für Kunstgeschichte (Paris), Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Kunsthistorisches Institut (Florence), and Warburg Haus (Hamburg). Each institution is represented by one of the five Professors who also direct the research project: Andreas Beyer (Basel/Paris) who is also functioning as the research centre’s speaker, Horst Bredekamp (Berlin), Uwe Fleckner (Hamburg), David Freedberg (London), and Gerhard Wolf (Florence).

Aims

The Project includes researchers based at institutions around Europe, including here - the Deutsches Forum für Kunstgeschichte (Paris)

The Project includes researchers based at institutions around Europe, including here – the Deutsche Forum für Kunstgeschichte (Paris)

The research project seeks to provide a fundamental contribution to a cultural history – through a history of images and ideas practiced in an interdisciplinary and international setting. Through its own quite specific expertise with images Art History has the opportunity to establish the autonomy of the image, which it can then offer as an independent and constitutive aspect to an interdisciplinary cultural scholarship. At the same time one of the research project’s special qualities consists in engaging with the specific character of images without positing an image-language opposition. Instead, it seeks to explore language’s complementary arc of development and work with it. If, as has been said, Art History in general is predestined to be an open partner in expansive, interdisciplinary research, the Bilderfahrzeuge research project in particular relies on a fertile field of dialogue in order to pursue its comprehensive cultural approach. It will provide appropriate mechanisms to discuss the transfer of image concepts and forms, by means of the concept of ‘Bilderfahrzeuge’ – the vehicles of images. In terms of media science, the ‘vehicle’ itself, its particular and specific historical forms, provide a point of interest. At the same time, ‘images’ are regarded as the main focus of the research. It takes material images as a theme as well as linguistic images, but also considers access to images, or treatment and use of them, in literature, the humanities, and science.

Team

Another partner institution, the Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin.

Another partner institution, the Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin.

Therefore, the research project consists of art historians, medievalist historians, comparativists, and philosophers from Italy, France, Germany, the US, Mexico, and the UK. The overall project is formed of various subprojects that range from material-based art historical research (Eckart Marchand, Anna McSweeney, Pablo Schneider, Elena Tolstichin, Isabella Woldt) to cultural historical and literary ones (Linda Báez Rubí, Philipp Ekardt, Christopher Johnson, Johannes von Müller) to historiographical analyses in the broadest sense (Victor Claass, Maria Teresa Costa, Hans Christian Hönes). Yet, these diverse studies benefit from a close cooperation that leads to constant interchanges and works towards annulling a definite differentiation of topics and fields.

Structure

The Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz.

The Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz.

Every institution outside London houses two scientific collaborators who are working on their individual projects: one collaborator each in Berlin, Florence, Hamburg, and Paris and one in London. Thus the various partners send in total four collaborators to the Warburg Institute. Guaranteeing a continuous exchange with their home institutions, these delegates work together with their London colleagues: three scientific collaborators, an archivist, the research centre’s assistant, and the coordinator. Thus, the Warburg Institute stands at the centre of the Bilderfahrzeuge project.

Warburg

The Warburg Haus (Hamburg)

The Warburg Haus (Hamburg)

The research project is not primarily committed to monographic Warburg research – though some of the scientific collaborators will focus on these items. Nevertheless, the research is closely related to Warburg and his circle in its findings and debates. These create the background for methodological and theoretical discussion. Warburg’s methods and approaches allow access to images in a highly sensitive way. Such sensitivity is fundamental since almost all aspects of modern life are influenced by images. This applies to the entertainment industry, performative forms of commodities, or the political sphere. Possibly with even more serious consequences, images have an impact on all areas of knowledge and research – not only the humanities but natural sciences too. At the dawn of this new age of media Warburg himself demonstrated the wide use of his methods. He examined the international press and war propaganda over the course of the First World War, using his experience in handling images. Here lie the possibilities in reconstructing and updating his research approach. That approach is closely linked to the school of ‘iconology’ through the intellectual figure Erwin Panofsky, maybe the most famous of Warburg’s students, and his concepts for examining images. This school of ‘iconology’ will function as the core of a new, genuinely transcultural and trans-epochal intellectual research method for examining the history of images.

Contact

Speaker

Prof. Dr. Andreas Beyer
The Warburg Institue
Woburn Square
London WC1H 0AB
England
andreas.beyer@unibas.ch

Coordinator

Johannes von Müller
The Warburg Institute
Woburn Square
London WC1 0AB
England
Tel: +44 (0) 207 862 87 75
vonmueller@bilderfahrzeuge.org

„Bilderfahrzeuge“

Warburg quote‚Bilderfahrzeuge’ ist ein Begriff, den der deutsche Kunsthistoriker Aby Warburg (1866-1929) geprägt hat. Er steht im Zusammenhang mit einem Konzept, das für den Kulturwissenschaftler von zentraler Bedeutung war, verfolgte er doch, unter anderem, das Ziel, Kontinuitäten zwischen Antike und Renaissance aufzuzeigen – Kontinuitäten, die er materialisiert sah in der ‚Bilderwanderung’. Dabei ist Warburg nicht der Einzige, der ein Interesse an diesem Problem gezeigt hat, und auch nicht der Erste. Die 1891 erschienene Untersuchung des Grafen Goblet D’Alviella La Migration des Symboles ist nur ein frühes Beispiel unter einer ganzen Reihe von Arbeiten, die einen ähnlichen Ansatz verfolgen. Warburg allerdings ist es gelungen, das Phänomen selbst bildlich zu artikulieren und zwar in Gestalt seines berühmten Bilderatlasses, dessen Protagonisten – Motive, deren Wanderung durch Zeit und Raum über den Verlauf der Bildtafeln evident wird – nichts anderes sind als besagte ‚Bilderfahrzeuge’.

Unterstützer und Beteiligte

Der Forschungsverbund „Bilderfahrzeuge. Aby Warburg’s Legacy and the Future of Iconology“ verfolgt das Ziel, die Wanderung von Bildern, Objekten, Gütern, Texten, kurz: die Wanderung von Ideen in einem weiten historischen und geografischen Kontext zu erforschen. Das Projekt wird unterstützt durch das Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung, ausgeführt in Kooperation mit der Max Weber Stiftung und ist situiert am Warburg Institute, London, ebenso wie am Deutschen Forum für Kunstgeschichte, Paris, der Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, dem Kunsthistorischen Institut, Florenz, und dem Warburg-Haus, Hamburg. Jede Institution ist vertreten durch einen der fünf Professoren, die das Projekt leiten: Andreas Beyer (Basel/Paris), der zugleich als Sprecher des Forschungsverbundes fungiert, Horst Bredekamp (Berlin), Uwe Fleckner (Hamburg), David Freedberg (London) und Gerhard Wolf (Florenz).

Ziele

Der Forschungsverbund strebt an, einen grundsätzlichen Beitrag zu einer erneuerten Kulturgeschichte zu leisten – durch eine Bild- und Ideengeschichte, betrieben in einem interdisziplinären und internationalen Umfeld. Kraft der eigenen, spezifischen Erfahrung im Umgang mit Bildern vermag das Fach Kunstgeschichte die eigenständige Bedeutung des Bildes zu erfassen und diese als unabhängigen und konstitutiven Aspekt in eine interdisziplinäre Kulturwissenschaft einzubringen. Einer der Vorzüge des Forschungsverbundes „Bilderfahrzeuge“ besteht darin, eben diesem Charakter des Bildes gerecht zu werden, ohne aber eine Opposition von Bild und Text entstehen zu lassen. Stattdessen wird versucht, deren wechselseitige Inspiration und Ergänzung zu beschreiben und damit zu arbeiten. Dabei lebt der Forschungsverbund vom Austausch und Dialog der Disziplinen, der allein den angestrebten umfassenden kulturwissenschaftlichen Zugang ermöglicht. Er bietet das methodische Werkzeug, den Transfer von Bildkonzepten und -formen zu erfassen und zu analysieren, und das in zeit- und gatttungsübergreifender Perspektive.

Gruppe

Aus diesem Grund besteht der Forschungsverbund aus Kunsthistorikern, Mittelalterhistorikern, Komparatisten und Philosophen aus Italien, Frankreich, Deutschland, den USA, Mexiko und dem Vereinigten Königreich. Das Gesamtprojekt setzt sich aus einer ganzen Reihe von Teilprojekten zusammen. Sie reichen von materialbasierter, historischer Forschung (Eckart Marchand, Anna McSweeney, Pablo Schneider, Elena Tolstichin, Isabella Woldt) über kultur- und literaturwissenschaftliche Ansätze (Linda Baez Rubí, Philipp Ekardt, Christopher Johnson, Johannes von Müller) bis hin zu Wissenschaftsgeschichte im weitesten Sinne (Victor Claass, Maria Teresa Costa, Hans Christian Hönes). All diese verschiedenen Studien profitieren von der engen Zusammenarbeit, die zu ständigem Austausch führt und letztlich den integrativen und transdisziplinären Ansatz des Forschungsverbundes definiert.

Struktur

Jeder Institution außerhalb Londons sind zwei wissenschaftliche MitarbeiterInnen verbunden, die an ihren individuellen Projekten arbeiten: je ein/e Mitarbeiter/in in Berlin, Florenz, Hamburg und Paris, sowie ein/e Mitarbeiter/in  in London. So senden die beteiligten Institutionen insgesamt vier MitarbeiterInnen an das Warburg Institute, London. Damit ist ein steter Austausch zwischen den Institutionen gewährleistet. In London arbeiten die „Delegierten“ zusammen mit ihren KollegInnen: drei wissenschaftlichen MitarbeiterInnen, einem Archivar, der Projektassistentin und dem wissenschaftlichen Koordinator. Womit das Warburg Institute im Zentrum des Bilderfahrzeuge-Projekts steht. Regelmässige workshops, Gastvorlesungen und ein Jahreskongress strukturieren das wissenschaftliche Veranstaltungsprogramm.

Warburg

Der Forschungsverbund verschreibt sich nicht primär einer monographischen Warburg-Forschung – auch wenn manche der wissenschaftlichen MitarbeiterInnen sich auf diese konzentrieren. Zwar ist die Arbeit des Forschungsverbunds sehr wohl den Erkenntnissen und Debatten Warburgs und seines Kreises verbunden. Doch formen diese lediglich das Fundament für die methodische und theoretische Ausarbeitung über die gesamte Dauer des Projekts. Warburgs Methoden und Zugänge erlauben einen hoch sensiblen Umgang mit Bildern. Dieser ist von grundlegender Bedeutung, da sich fast alle Aspekte des modernen Lebens von Bildern beeinflusst zeigen. Das gilt etwa ebenso für die Unterhaltungsindustrie wie auch für den Bereich des Politischen. Mit vielleicht noch schwerwiegenderen Konsequenzen wirken sich Bilder aus auf alle Bereiche des Wissens und der Forschung – nicht der Geisteswissenschaften allein, sondern auch der Naturwissenschaften. Am Beginn eben dieses neuen Medienzeitalters hat Warburg selbst die breite Nutzbarkeit seiner Methodik vorgeführt. Er untersuchte die internationale Presse und Kriegspropaganda über den Verlauf des 1. Weltkrieges und griff dabei zurück auf seine Erfahrung im Umgang mit Bildern. Hier liegen die Möglichkeiten, die sich mit einer Rekonstruktion und einer Weiterentwicklung eines solchen methodischen Ansatzes bieten. Durch die intellektuelle Gestalt Erwin Panofskys, vielleicht Warburgs berühmtestem „Schüler“, ist dieser Ansatz unmittelbar verbunden mit der Schule der Ikonologie und dem von ihr angestrebten Konzept einer Bildanalyse. Diese Schule der Ikonologie soll als Ausgangspunkt einer neuen, genuin transkulturellen und transepochalen intellektuellen Methode zur Erforschung einer Bildgeschichte dienen.

Kontakt

Sprecher

Prof. Dr. Andreas Beyer
The Warburg Institue
Woburn Square
London WC1H 0AB
England
andreas.beyer@unibas.ch

Koordinator

Johannes von Müller
The Warburg Institute
Woburn Square
London WC1 0AB
England
Tel: +44 (0) 207 862 87 75
vonmueller@bilderfahrzeuge.org